‘India Könyvtár’ sorozat

The “India Library” Project started in 2011 with the help of the Embassy of India. The aim of the project is translating into Hungarian and publishing in the form of a series textual sources, belletristic works and scholarly literature connected with the cultural history of India. The translated works include both classical and modern texts in various languages, from Sanskrit to Hindi and Bengali. The goal is to make the educated Hungarian readers more familiar with the classical and modern culture of India through reliable sources and scholarly works of the highest standard, translated from the original languages by Hungarian Indologists, graduates of the Department of Indian Studies. These translations give the Hungarian readership access to the beauty and variety of both classical and modern Indian literature and hopefully will be a source of inspiration in the contemporary Hungarian cultural scene and promote, e.g., the staging of Indian plays in Hungarian theatres.

The first book of the series “A négy fal között” (Ghere ke bhītar “Among Four Walls”, 2011) is a representative collection of Hariśankar Parsāī’s satirical short stories. The stories were selected and translated by Judit Bernadett Borbély from Hindi into Hungarian. The second book of the Indian Library commemorating the 150th birth anniversary of Rabindranath Tagore is Imre Bangha’s “Jöttem a Gangesz partjairól” (“I Have Arrived from the Banks of Ganges”, 2011). This is a monograph about the cultural encounter between Bengali and Hungarian literary cultures. The third book was published in 2012 on Indian mathematics, based on an MA thesis written by Miklós Hegedűs, a graduate of the Department (“Az algebra vívmányai az ind matematika klasszikus korszakában. Számrendszerek és aritmetikai megoldások”, i.e. “The Achievements of Algebra in the Classical Age of Indian Mathematics. Number Systems and Arithmetical Solutions”).

The latest publications in the series are the Hungarian translation by Judit Bernadett Borbély of Tamas (“Darkness”), the great novel by Bhīṣm Sāhnī and Manusmṛti (“The Laws of Manu”) with the comments of Csaba Dezső, along with a Hungarian-Hindi thematical student's thesaurus Ek Sārgarbhit Hindī Shabdāvalī by Péter Sági.